New ESS Publication: Targeted opportunities to address the climate–trade dilemma in China

International trade has become the fastest growing driver of global carbon emissions, with large quantities of emissions embodied in exports from emerging economies. International trade with emerging economies poses a dilemma for climate and trade policy: to the extent emerging markets have comparative advantages in manufacturing, such trade is economically efficient and desirable. However, if carbon-intensive manufacturing in emerging countries such as China entails drastically more CO2 emissions than making the same product elsewhere, then trade increases global CO2 emissions.

ESS Welcomes new faculty, Dr. Alex Guenther


The Department of Earth System Science is pleased to announce Dr. Alex Guenther has joined ESS as a Professor. Prior to joining ESS, Alex was a lead researcher at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Dr. Guenther is an international leader in atmospheric and terrestrial ecosystem research; we are delighted to welcome him to our team!

When asked his thoughts on joining ESS, Dr. Guenther told us:

New ESS Publication: Identification of two distinct fire regimes in Southern California: implications for economic impact and future change

The area burned by Southern California wildfires has increased in recent decades, with implications for human health, infrastructure, and ecosystem management. Meteorology and fuel structure are universally recognized controllers of wildfire, but their relative importance, and hence the efficacy of abatement and suppression efforts, remains controversial. Southern California's wildfires can be partitioned by meteorology: fires typically occur either during Santa Ana winds (SA fires) in October through April, or warm and dry periods in June through September (non-SA fires).

New ESS Publication: Climate constraints on the carbon intensity of economic growth

Development and climate goals together constrain the carbon intensity of production. Using a simple and transparent model that represents committed CO2 emissions (future emissions expected to come from existing capital), we explore the carbon intensity of production related to new capital required for different temperature targets across several thousand scenarios.