Department Seminar

The impact of emissions of isoprene in a chemistry climate model

Coupled chemistry-climate models are being increasingly used to tackle the problem of understanding the mechanisms for driving changes in past, present and future atmospheric composition. Given the computational overheads of running these types of models the chemical mechanisms which are used are often chosen for their speed of simulation.

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Wednesday, December 18, 2013 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 
Croul Hall 3101
Speaker Information
Name: 
Alex Archibald
Affiliation: 
Centre for Atmospheric Science at Cambridge University
ESS Information
Holmes, Chris

Seminar: Exploring Key Model Physics in Simulating the Madden-Julian Oscillation

The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) exerts tremendous influences on global climate and weather systems, but our current general circulation models (GCMs) exhibit rather limited capability in representing this prominent tropical variability mode. Also, the fundamental physics of the MJO are still elusive.

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Wednesday, May 6, 2015 - 2:00pm
Location: 
3101 Croul Hall
Speaker Information
Name: 
Xian-an Jiang
Affiliation: 
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
ESS Information
Yu, Jin-Yi

Seminar: Balancing water resources conservation and food security in China

China's economic growth is expected to continue into the next decades, accompanied by a sustained urbanization and industrialization. The associated increase in demand for land, water resources, and rich foods will deepen the challenge to sustainably feed the population and to balance agricultural and environmental policies.

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Wednesday, April 1, 2015 - 2:00pm
Location: 
3101 Croul Hall
Speaker Information
Name: 
Carole Dalin
Title: 
Postdoctoral Researcher
Affiliation: 
Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change & the Environment/London School of Economics & Political Science
ESS Information
Davis, Steven

Seminar: The Role of Terrestrially-Derived Organic Carbon in the Coastal Ocean: A Changing Paradigm

Although inland waters comprise a small fraction of Earth’s surface, they play a critical role in the global C cycle. Global estimates of riverine flux of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the oceans range from about 250 to 360 Tg y-1. Interestingly, only a small fraction of the roughly 2900 Tg C yr-1 transported through inland waters globally ever reaches the ocean.

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 
3101 Croul Hall
Speaker Information
Name: 
Tom Bianchi
Title: 
Jon and Beverly Thompson Endowed Chair of Geological Sciences
Affiliation: 
University of Florida
ESS Information
Coppola, Alysha

Seminar: The plant-soil system in a changing world - selected research highlights from work on vegetation fire, chronic nitrogen deposition, afforestation, and summer drought on soil organic matter

The presentation will highlight results on projects on vegetation fire, chronic nitrogen deposition, afforestation, and summer drought in Switzerland. Additionally present and future work in the new Univ. Zurich Research Priority Program on Global Change and Biodiversity with work in the Siberian tundra, temperate beech forest, and Borneo rain forest will be presented.
Event Information
Event date and time: 
Wednesday, April 15, 2015 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 
3101 Croul Hall
Speaker Information
Name: 
Michael Schmidt
Title: 
Professor of Physical Geography
Affiliation: 
University of Bergen
ESS Information
Czimczik, Claudia

Seminar: Large Increasing Trend of Tropical Cyclone Rainfall in Taiwan and the Roles of Terrain and Southwest Monsoon

Taiwan, which is situated in one of the main paths of western North Pacific tropical cyclones (TCs), has experienced a dramatic increase in typhoon-related rainfall, with nine of the top 12 typhoons in total rainfall since hourly rainfall observations started in 1960 have occurred in the 21st century. This record breaking increase has led to suggestions that they are the manifestation of the effects of global climate change include global warming. Typhoon rainfall intensity is analyzed with respect to typhoon tracks that are in different regimes relative to the meso-α scale terrain.

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Friday, February 27, 2015 - 1:00pm
Location: 
CH 3101
Speaker Information
Name: 
Hung-Chi Kuo
Title: 
Professor of Atmospheric Sciences
Affiliation: 
National Taiwan University
ESS Information
Magnusdottir, Gudrun

Seminar: Climatic and anthropogenic feedbacks to atmospheric methane emissions

Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas with myriad natural and anthropogenic sources.  The high short-term global warming potential of methane means that an increase in emission rates could lead to rapid climate warming.  Methane is released due to anthropogenic activities as well as due to climate warming.
Event Information
Event date and time: 
Wednesday, May 13, 2015 - 2:00pm
Location: 
Croul Hall 3101
Speaker Information
Name: 
Amy Townsend-Small
ESS Information
Czimczik, Claudia

Seminar: Simona Bordoni

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Wednesday, January 21, 2015 - 2:00pm
Location: 
3101 Croul Hall
Speaker Information
Name: 
Simona Bordoni
ESS Information
Magnusdottir, Gudrun

Seminar: Satellite Data for Air Quality Management

Satellite observations offer a powerful source of data to support air quality management, by providing information about air pollutant concentrations, trends, and transport, particularly where no other monitors are available; identification of pollution sources to constrain emissions estimates; and regional characterization of air pollutant distributions to support air monitor siting decisions.

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Friday, February 20, 2015 - 2:00pm
Location: 
3101 Croul Hall
Speaker Information
Name: 
Tracey Holloway
Title: 
Professor of Environmental Studies
Affiliation: 
University of Wisconsin, Madison
ESS Information
Davis, Steven

Seminar: Reducing uncertainty in regional climate projection: New challenge for coupled ocean-atmosphere dynamics

Global mean temperature has risen for the past century and is projected to rise even more in response to the increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Precipitation change is of vital importance to societies but precipitation projections are intrinsically challenging as they change sign from one region to another. Recent studies show that in the tropics, radiatively forced changes in precipitation and atmospheric circulation are tightly coupled to spatial patterns of ocean surface warming.

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Wednesday, February 4, 2015 - 2:00pm
Location: 
3101 Croul Hall
Speaker Information
Name: 
Professor Shang-Ping Xie
Affiliation: 
Scripps Institution of Oceanography
ESS Information
Yu, Jin-Yi