Department Seminar

The impact of emissions of isoprene in a chemistry climate model

Coupled chemistry-climate models are being increasingly used to tackle the problem of understanding the mechanisms for driving changes in past, present and future atmospheric composition. Given the computational overheads of running these types of models the chemical mechanisms which are used are often chosen for their speed of simulation.

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Wednesday, December 18, 2013 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 
Croul Hall 3101
Speaker Information
Name: 
Alex Archibald
Affiliation: 
Centre for Atmospheric Science at Cambridge University
ESS Information
Holmes, Chris

Seminar: Alex Horne

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Wednesday, February 11, 2015 - 2:00pm
Location: 
3101 Croul Hall
ESS Information
Earth System Science @ UC Irvine

Seminar: Tracey Holloway

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Friday, February 20, 2015 - 2:00pm
Location: 
3101 Croul Hall
Speaker Information
Name: 
Tracey Holloway
Title: 
Professor of Environmental Studies
Affiliation: 
University of Wisconsin, Madison
ESS Information
Davis, Steven

Seminar: Professor Shang-Ping Xie

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Wednesday, February 4, 2015 - 2:00pm
Location: 
3101 Croul Hall
Speaker Information
Name: 
Professor Shang-Ping Xie
Affiliation: 
Scripps Institution of Oceanography
ESS Information
Yu, Jin-Yi

Seminar: Professor Noel Keenlyside

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Wednesday, January 28, 2015 - 2:00pm
Location: 
3101 Croul Hall
Speaker Information
Name: 
Professor Noel Keenlyside
Affiliation: 
University of Bergen, Norway
ESS Information
Yu, Jin-Yi

ESS Seminar: Robert Pincus

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Friday, January 16, 2015 - 2:00pm
Location: 
3101 Croul Hall
Speaker Information
Name: 
Robert Pincus
ESS Information
Pritchard, Mike

Seminar: Towards Robust Multi-Scale Atmospheric Models

The most pressing needs in understand climate change are now on the regional and local scale. Although it is well known that global temperatures will increase in the next century, what is more poorly known is how these changes will affect populations on the local scale.  Consequently there is a pressing need to bring the predictions of climate models down to scales amenable to policy makers on this level.

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Wednesday, November 12, 2014 - 2:00pm
Location: 
3101 Croul Hall
Speaker Information
Name: 
Paul Ullrich
Title: 
Assistant Professor
Affiliation: 
UC Davis
ESS Information
Pritchard, Mike

Seminar Series: Tracing terrestrial biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 and H2O using stable isotopes

Tracing terrestrial biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 and H2O using stable isotopes

Dr. Lisa R. Welp

Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Wednesday, October 8, 2014 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 
3101 Croul Hall
Speaker Information
Name: 
Dr. Lisa Welp
Title: 
Assistant Project Scientist
Affiliation: 
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego
ESS Information
Randerson, Jim

Seminar: Eddy-driven sediment transport in the Argentine Basin: a tale of an anticyclone and a seamount

The Argentine Basin in the southwest South Atlantic Ocean is a fascinating ocean basin. In this seminar I will give an overview of the many intriguing aspects of the oceanography and sedimentology of this basin. This overview will introduce a problem that has baffled scientists since the early 60’s, namely the existence of the Zapiola Rise, a sedimentary deposit in the center of the basin that is believed to be the largest offshore body of sediment in the World Ocean.

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Wednesday, November 19, 2014 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 
3101 Croul Hall
Speaker Information
Name: 
Wilbert Weijer
Affiliation: 
Los Alamos National Laboratory
ESS Information
Primeau, Francois

How the expansion of the tropics projects on the environment and on tropical cyclone genesis?

The global average latitude where tropical cyclones achieve their lifetime-maximum intensity has been migrating poleward at the rate of about a degree of latitude per decade over the last 30 years (Kossin et al. 2014), which is consistent with the observed expansion of the tropics. This result raises important questions:

- What changes in the environmental conditions could drive the migration of the lifetime-maximum intensity of tropical cyclones?

Event Information
Event date and time: 
Wednesday, December 3, 2014 - 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Location: 
3101 Croul Hall
Speaker Information
Name: 
Dr. Anne Sophie Daloz
Affiliation: 
University of Madison - Wisconsin
ESS Information
Earth System Science @ UC Irvine